What is Routing?

Routing to an auxiliary channel

There are times when you may want to route (send) groups of channels  to another channel. An auxiliary is simply a channel that is configured to allow the outputs of other channels to be routed to its inputs.

Sending groups of channels to a single ‘master’ channel has many advantages.

  • Some reverbs and effects require a lot of processing power. Adding a separate plug-in to each drum channel will put a strain on your computers CPU.
  • You will most likely want the entire drum kit to sound like it is in the same space.
  • In order to quickly try different Eq or effect settings  you only need to change the parameters of one device.
  • You have the added advantage of one master fader for the overall level of your selected instruments..

In the diagram below you can see how the individual drum channels have been routed to an auxiliary channel.

Step by step guide to routing:

  1. Create a new auxiliary channel and set its input to bus 1 for a mono channel 0r 1 & 2 for a stereo channel. Set it’s output to 1 & 2 or whichever is your usual output assignment.
  2. Set the output of the channel you wish to send to the auxiliary channel, to bus 1 (mono) or 1 & 2 (stereo).
  3. Repeat step 2 for each channel you wish to send to the auxiliary channel.

You can of course route any combination of channels to an auxiliary and you can have more than one auxiliary channel too. For example you may wish to send all of the drum channels to bus 1 & 2 and all of your backing vocals to bus 3 & 4. You could send all the instrument channels to one bus and all the vocal channels to another thereby allowing you to change the vocal to instrument balance with only two faders. You could use the insert sends to send the channel simultaneously to an auxiliary channel with an effect on it such as reverb. There are numerous possibilities and exploring different methods of routing is recommended.